Monday, October 24, 2005

They make hay while it rains in Bangalore

Deccan Herald

First the good news: Like Mumbai, Bangalore too has its share of good samaritans — strangers who will willingly lend a helping hand as you find your way in waist-deep water, give a push to a stranded car, and flash a cheerful smile as you groan over your soiled clothes.

Now the bad: Good deeds, in Bangalore, cost money.

For holding your hand while you wade your way out: Rs 15. For pushing a two-wheeler: Rs 100-Rs 150. For pushing a two-wheeler: Rs 250-Rs 300. For repairing a vehicle: Rs 300-Rs 500.

The local population around Hosur Road has hit upon a profitable business proposition overnight. Over a hundred villagers from surrounding villages have posted themselves next to the flooded Hosur Road, waiting, and praying, for the passing cars and two-wheelers to get stuck in the submerged stretch. Fortunately for them, this situation is not a possibility, but an eventuality, on this clogged road where the water level has reached over three feet. There are over 10 mechanics on the job, making the best of the situation. Each had an army of at least 10 younger boys, who were responsible for bringing in customers-in-distress for help. Thousands of broken down vehicles were pushed or repaired by these men over the last two days, and many have managed to earn up to Rs 10,000.

“There is nothing wrong in charging money, because we are, after all, providing a service,” says Shankar, a resident of Bommanahalli. One of these “helpers” admitted to having a differential rate chart. IT professionals are charged more, and so are owners of swanky cars. This reporter, who was at the site, was let off at a discounted price of Rs 25.">Sights, sounds and smells from Bangalore: "They make hay while it rains in Bangalore

Deccan Herald

First the good news: Like Mumbai, Bangalore too has its share of good samaritans — strangers who will willingly lend a helping hand as you find your way in waist-deep water, give a push to a stranded car, and flash a cheerful smile as you groan over your soiled clothes.

Now the bad: Good deeds, in Bangalore, cost money.

For holding your hand while you wade your way out: Rs 15. For pushing a two-wheeler: Rs 100-Rs 150. For pushing a two-wheeler: Rs 250-Rs 300. For repairing a vehicle: Rs 300-Rs 500.

The local population around Hosur Road has hit upon a profitable business proposition overnight. Over a hundred villagers from surrounding villages have posted themselves next to the flooded Hosur Road, waiting, and praying, for the passing cars and two-wheelers to get stuck in the submerged stretch. Fortunately for them, this situation is not a possibility, but an eventuality, on this clogged road where the water level has reached over three feet. There are over 10 mechanics on the job, making the best of the situation. Each had an army of at least 10 younger boys, who were responsible for bringing in customers-in-distress for help. Thousands of broken down vehicles were pushed or repaired by these men over the last two days, and many have managed to earn up to Rs 10,000.

“There is nothing wrong in charging money, because we are, after all, providing a service,” says Shankar, a resident of Bommanahalli. One of these “helpers” admitted to having a differential rate chart. IT professionals are charged more, and so are owners of swanky cars. This reporter, who was at the site, was let off at a discounted price of Rs 25."

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

<< Home

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5 License.